• The anecdote at the beginning of this article demonstrates how dangerous racing is for jockeys and horses
    • A jockey was paralyzed when his horse broke its leg and fell on the track, and a similar incident occurred the next day.
    • Both horses were euthanized, and their bodies were dumped in a junkyard
  • An average of 24 racehorses die yearly on the track
    • “Many are inexpensive horses racing with little regulatory protection in pursuit of bigger and bigger prizes.”
    • Their bodies are not examined after the horses break down; if they are euthanized, the bodies are most often thrown out
    • Eight Belles, who PETA also mentioned in an article, broke down on a racetrack in 2008
  • Racetracks often do not keep records of accidents on the track
  • “A computer analysis of data from more than 150,000 races, along with injury reports, drug test results and interviews, shows an industry still mired in a culture of drugs and lax regulation and a fatal breakdown rate that remains far worse than in most of the world.”
  • Racetracks have started opening casinos in order to make money, but this only makes trainers want to race their horses more, as the chance of winning a large amount is higher
    • Higher numbers of accidents have been reported at some racetracks that have opened casinos–people are racing unfit horses
  •  A survey from the New York Times found that 3,600 horses died on racetracks between 2009 and 2012
  • Drug use is a problem
    • Laboratories are unable to detect many new performance-enhancing drugs
    • Trainers will try to use any type of drug that might enhance a horse’s performance, but this could contribute to breakdowns
    • Before going to races, people drug their horses on private farms, where they cannot be legally tested
    • Pain medicine is risky for horses, and many of them are considered “therapeutic” and are therefore legal for use on the track
  • Some trainers are notorious for drugging horses, but they are still allowed to participate in the sport
  • Penalties are often just small fines–they do not discourage trainers from breaking the rules. “Sometimes the same horse is illegally drugged twice.”
  • The testimonies of some previously injured jockeys tell that they also think that horses should be given time to heal–horses that are injured can be dangerous for everyone on the track

Bogdanich, Walt, et al. “Mangled Horses, Maimed Jockeys.” The New York Times, 24 March 2012. Web.

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