“Street Photography.” Oxford Art Online. Oxford University Press, n.d. Web. 25 July 2016. <http://www.oxfordartonline.com&gt;

  • “(A) Genre of photography that can be understood as the product of an artistic interaction between a photographer and an urban public space.” (25 July 2016)
  • Street differs from documentary because there is no political or social aim or function of the photograph. (25 July 2016)
  • Street photography is different from photojournalism because it’s not used to tell a news story. (25 July 2016)
  • Street photography did not become an established separate type of photography until the 1900s because the long exposure times needed for photographs did not allow for it. (25 July 2016)
  • The daguerreotypes exposure was too long to allow for anything in “street” photographs, but people who stood still for a long time to be captured – moving/bustling crowds is a trademark theme of street photography. (25 July 2016)
  • In the 1850s and 1860s, mostly wet collodion negatives were used, which still required a long exposure. Preparation, exposure, and development all had to be done within 10 minutes which did not lend itself to street photographs because you couldn’t easily leave a studio. (25 July 2016)
  • Dry-plate negatives, used in the 1870s, and gelatin silver roll film in the 1880s made it easier to take street photographs. (25 July 2016)
  • Atget’s photographs of Paris in the late 1800s/early 1900s were originally supposed to be supplements to artists, rather than independent pieces. However, their way of conveying a mood of Paris has made Atget into the perceived godfather of street photography. (25 July 2016)
  • Two street photographers, Alfred Stieglitz and Paul Strand, in New York in the early 1990s helped to contribute to the genre, but for neither of them was street photography their primary interest. (25 July 2016)
  • One importance of street photography was André Kertész, who used the 35mm camera in the late 1920s/early 30s to show the graphic and surreal nature of urban life. (25 July 2016)
  • Brassai was an important street photographer who was introduced to photography by Kertész. He was known for photographs of Paris by night. His work was published in Paris de Nuit (1933), a foundational book of street photography. He helped to shape post-WWII street photography. (25 July 2016)
  • Henri Cartier-Bresson was an important street photographer in the 1930s. He was mentored by Kertész. Cartier-Bresson created the “decisive moment” idea, which is the moment when the subject and composition align. He photographed big cities like Paris, New York, and Madrid. (25 July 2016)
  • Cartier- Bresson helped to make spontaneity and intuition main principles of street photography. He was known for not using any camera but the Leica, not using flash, and (supposedly) refusing to crop his images. His book Images á la Sauvette lays out his ideas. (25 July 2016)
  • The years directly after WWII, 1940s – 1960s, was a very good time for street photography. Photographers such as Lisette Model, Helen Levitt, Louis Faurer, William Klein, and Robert Frank took some of their most iconic shots. (25 July 2016)
  • Helen Levitt was known for making images of the city feel human and universally relatable. (25 July 2016)
  • William Klein showed the aggressive and harsh life of post-WWII New York by using grainy and often blurry photographs of the brashness and restlessness of the city’s inhabitants. (25 July 2016)
  • Louis Faurer photographed the real human moments of urban life that went undocumented in the popular, mainstream images of America. He photographed rough nightlife, people’s quirks, and personal and intimate interactions. (25 July 2016)
  • Robert Franz created The Americans (1959), a book of mainly street photographs, but with other types too, that showed that street photography was legit and could be a job for real. (25 July 2016)
  • Outside of the US, post-war street photography was popular too. Several popular French photographers of the time were Robert Doisneau, Willy Ronis, and Izis. (25 July 2016)
  • Doisneau took one of the most iconic images of the era, The Kiss (1950). It showed a sailor kissing a woman in front of Hotel de Ville which displays the feeling of optimism after the war. (25 July 2016)
  • English street photographer Roger Mayne photographed the life of the working class post-war. His photographs foreshadowed tensions between the working class and the upper class dandies.  (25 July 2016)
  • Daido Moriyama was an important Japanese street photographer whose photographs showed the tragedy of Japan post-war as well as the tension between modernity and tradition in the country (25 July 2016)
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